Now showing 1 - 10 of 232
  • Publication
    Context-oriented communication and the design of computer-supported discursive learning
    ( 2008)
    Herrmann, T.
    ;
    Kienle, A.
    Computer-supported discursive learning (CSDL) systems for the support of asynchronous discursive learning need to fulfil specific socio-technical conditions. To understand these conditions, we employed design experiments combining aspects of communication theory, empirical findings, and continuous improvement of the investigated prototypes. Our theoretical perspective starts with a context-oriented model of communication which is-as a result of the experiments-extended by including the role of a third-party such as a facilitator. The theory-driven initial design requirements lead to the CSCL-prototype, KOLUMBUS, emphasizing the role of annotations. In KOLUMBUS, annotations can be immediately embedded in their context of learning material. Practical experience with the prototype in five cases reveals possibilities for implementing improvements and observing their impact. On this basis, we provide guidelines for the design of CSDL systems that focus on the support of asyn chronous discursive learning.
  • Publication
    Facilitating asynchronous discussions in learning communities: the impact of moderation strategies
    ( 2007)
    Kienle, A.
    ;
    Ritterskamp, C.
    A facilitator or moderator is often responsible for supporting processes and their progress in learning communities. In this article we present an approach for supporting moderators of asynchronous processes in learning communities. This approach follows the socio-technical perspective: it includes a theory-based development of moderator tasks and the technical features designed to support these tasks. Starting with relevant work in this area, we describe our approach to moderator support in the collaborative learning environment KOLUMBUS 2. In a qualitative study, a professional moderator facilitated the discussion processes of a group of 12 students based on KOLUMBUS 2. The moderator used different methods and varying levels of participation intervention. The study showed that different intervention strategies led to different levels of student participation and different successes in finding common results at the end of the discussions. Suggestions for the design of technical features are also made.
  • Publication
    The extended process model - transforming process specifications into ontological representations
    ( 2006)
    Brocks, H.
    ;
    Meyer, H.
    ;
    Kamps, T.
    ;
    Begger, C.
    Knowledge-intensive processes arc often open ended and can be only weakly specified in traditional business process models. The extended process model provides a comprehensive integration of process and knowledge specific aspects within a single, ontological representation. In this article we describe the transformation of standardized business process definitions into a unified conceptual process model. We then apply our methodology to the scenario of IT services.
  • Publication
    The CSCL community in its first decade: Development, continuity, connectivity
    ( 2006)
    Kienle, A.
    ;
    Wessner, M.
    Ten years of international CSCL conferences (1995-2005) provide an occasion to reflect on the formation of the CSCL community. Based on quantitative analysis of conference proceedings, lists of participants and program committee members, and on qualitative study of policies and motives, this paper offers insights into the growth of the CSCL community in its first decade. The analysis focuses on participation at different levels of the community. In particular, focus is on the continuity of active and passive membership, the geographical distribution, and the international connectivity of the community. Contrary to expectations, only a relatively small number of people have participated continuously in the community. Concerning the geographical distribution, we found that the community is increasingly international in conference participation, authors, and program committees. The international connectivity of the community is also increasing, which can be seen in a growi ng number of citations and co-authorships across different countries. In order to interpret the results of our quantitative study, we conducted a qualitative, e-mail-based survey. In this survey we wanted to elaborate the policy of the conference organization, the reasons for international co-authorships and the motivations for participation in CSCL conferences. We contacted 84 members of different target groups (organizers, members of international co-authorships, and randomly selected participants on different levels of participation). The findings are suggestive for the further development of the CSCL community.
  • Publication
    Integration of knowledge management and collaborative learning by technical supported communication processes
    ( 2006)
    Kienle, A.
    To date the development of technical systems to support learning either in schools and universities (CSCL-systems), or in companies (knowledge-management systems) have largely developed separately concurrent, with no or little mutual exchange of experience. The approach presented here seeks to combine the strengths of both lines of development in order that both benefits from each others advantages achieve advantages for each development. Detailed requirements engineering is presented regarding, three research fields: communication theory; learning processes; and a study in companies. The requirements collected led to a sophisticated concept of annotations where annotations serve as communicative contributions, and (segmented) material is used as context. The combination and distinction between communicative contributions, and the material itself is a suitable approach for integrating the advantages of CSCL-systems (communication support) and knowledge management system s (support of content storage). These requirements are combined in a software system, KOLUMBUS, presented with its key features. To gather experience with KOLUMBUS and to convey potential for further improvement, two case studies were conducted. The main results, advantages and further potentials derived from these two case studies are described in this paper. The paper concludes with design recommendations for similar technical systems, as well as organizational hints for CSCL-groups (in schools or universities as well as in companies).
  • Publication
    Architectural patterns for collaborative applications
    ( 2006)
    Avgeriou, P.
    ;
    Tandler, P.
    There is currently little reuse of either design or code in the development of collaborative applications. Though there are some application frameworks for this domain, they tend to be rather inflexible in the functionality they offer. This paper seeks to provide design reuse in the form of architectural patterns that focus on low-level horizontal issues: distribution, message exchange, functional decomposition, sharing data, concurrency and synchronisation. We base these patterns on a number of well-established patterns in the domain of distributed applications, concentrating on the specific issues that are encountered in the domain of collaborative applications. We also outline the relation between these low-level architectural patterns and the high-level functionality that collaborative applications offer. By codifying this knowledge and experience in the form of patterns, we hope for a wider support of low-level architectural design to the community of collaborative applications and thus a further advance of the field.
  • Publication
    A multiagent environment for the flexible enactment of knowledge-intensive processes
    ( 2006)
    Bayer, K.
    ;
    Kempf, S.
    ;
    Brocks, H.
    ;
    Kamps, T.
    Knowledge-intensive processes are characterized by vague specifications and a dynamic course of action. They require a flexible, knowledge-based enactment environment supporting the dynamic allocation of resources, changes in assignments, organizational structure, policies, and requirement and priorities, but also conflicts between resources participating in different processes. In this article, we present a multiagent enactment environment that incorporates the flexible allocation of resources but is also capable of handling various types of runtime exceptions. The benefits of adopting a knowledge-based approach are demonstrated based on a prototype implementation of an IT-Helpdesk scenario.