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Inhomogeneous strain in silicon photonics

 
: Wehrspohn, R.B.; Schriever, C.; Schilling, J.

:

Mascher, P. ; Electrochemical Society -ECS-:
Nanoscale Luminescent Materials 3 : May 12-14, 2014, Orlando, Florida, International Symposium on Silicon Compatible Materials, Processes, and Technologies for Advanced Integrated Circuits and Emerging Applications 4, held as part of the 225th Meeting of the Electrochemical Society
Pennington, NJ: ECS, 2014 (ECS transactions 61.2014, Nr.5)
ISBN: 978-1-62332-164-2 (Print)
ISBN: 978-1-60768-520-3 (PDF)
S.161-173
International Symposium on Silicon Compatible Materials, Processes, and Technologies for Advanced Integrated Circuits and Emerging Applications <4, 2014, Orlando/Fla.>
Electrochemical Society (ECS Meeting) <225, 2014, Orlando/Fla.>
Englisch
Konferenzbeitrag
Fraunhofer IWM ( IMWS) ()

Abstract
The lack of a dipolar second order susceptibility (x (2)) in silicon due to its centrosymmetric diamond lattice usually inhibits efficient second order nonlinear optical processes in the silicon bulk. Depositing stressed silicon nitride layers or growing a thermal oxide layer introduces an inhomogeneous strain into the silicon lattice and breaks the centrosymmetry of its crystal structure thereby creating a x (2). This causes enhanced second harmonic generation and was observed in reflection and transmission measurements for wavelengths in the infrared. However strain is not the only means to break the structures symmetry. Fixed charges at the silicon nitride/silicon interface cause a high electric field close to the silicon interface which causes electric-field-induced-second-harmonic (EFISH) contributions too. The combination of both effects leads to x (2) values which are estimated to be of the order as classic x (2) materials like KDP or LiNiO3. This paves the way f or the exploitation of other second order nonlinear processes in the area of silicon photonics and is an example how fundamental optical properties of materials can be formed by strain.

: http://publica.fraunhofer.de/dokumente/N-351403.html