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Evaluation of Nanoparticle Inks on Flexible and Stretchable Substrates for Biocompatible Application

 
: Schubert, Martin; Rebohle, Lars; Wang, Yakun; Fritsch, Marco; Bock, Karlheinz; Vinnichenko, Mykola; Schumann, Thomas

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TU Dresden, Institut für Aufbau- und Verbindungstechnik der Elektronik -IAVT-; Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers -IEEE-; International Microelectronics and Packaging Society -IMAPS-:
7th Electronic System-Integration Technology Conference, ESTC 2018. Proceedings : 18th to 21st Sept. 2018, Dresden, Germany
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, 2018
ISBN: 978-1-5386-6814-6
ISBN: 978-1-5386-6813-9
ISBN: 978-1-5386-6815-3
6 pp.
Electronic System-Integration Technology Conference (ESTC) <7, 2018, Dresden>
English
Conference Paper
Fraunhofer IKTS ()
flexible; stretchable; biocompatible; photonic sintering; platinum; silver; nanoparticle ink; flash lamp; laser sintering

Abstract
The flexible and stretchable electronic market is increasing particularly in the field of biomedical electronics. Widely used printed silver conductive tracks today are only eligible for on-skin applications. However, for biomedical applications fully biocompatible, flexible and even stretchable materials for device fabrication are needed. This paper presents an additive printing approach to fabricate flexible and stretchable electronics by using a biocompatible platinum material. Usually, in order to realize electrically conducting Pt-interconnects by inkjet printing, it requires a furnace sintering at prohibitively high temperatures, which are not compatible with thermal sensitive polymeric substrates. This paper describes a high-power diode laser sintering (HPDL) and a flash lamp annealing (FLA) as promising alternative sintering methods. Both processes are eligible whereas laser sintering showed slightly better results. Bending tests and adhesive strength tests of platinum printed inks on polyimide with up to 180 000 cycles, show that printed platinum is a suitable biocompatible material for flexible electronics.

: http://publica.fraunhofer.de/documents/N-531769.html