Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

Publica

Hier finden Sie wissenschaftliche Publikationen aus den Fraunhofer-Instituten.

The Plasmodium falciparum blood stages acquire factor H family proteins to evade destruction by human complement

 
: Rosa, T.F.A.; Flammersfeld, A.; Ngwa, C.J.; Kiesow, M.; Fischer, R.; Zipfel, P.F.; Skerka, C.; Pradel, G.

:
Fulltext (PDF; )

Cellular microbiology 18 (2016), No.4, pp.573-590
ISSN: 1462-5814
ISSN: 1462-5822
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft DFG
PR905/1-3,
Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft DFG
PR905/4-1
European Commission EC
FP7-HEALTH; 223044; MALSIG
Signalling in life cycle stages of malaria parasites
English
Journal Article, Electronic Publication
Fraunhofer IME ()

Abstract
The acquisition of regulatory proteins is a means of blood-borne pathogens to avoid destruction by the human complement. We recently showed that the gametes of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum bind factor H (FH) from the blood meal of the mosquito vector to assure successful sexual reproduction, which takes places in the mosquito midgut. While these findings provided a first glimpse of a complex mechanism used by Plasmodium to control the host immune attack, it is hitherto not known, how the pathogenic blood stages of the malaria parasite evade destruction by the human complement. We now show that the human complement system represents a severe threat for the replicating blood stages, particularly for the reinvading merozoites, with complement factor C3b accumulating on the surfaces of the intraerythrocytic schizonts as well as of free merozoites. C3b accumulation initiates terminal complement complex formation, in consequence resulting in blood stage lysis. To inactivate C3b, the parasites bind FH as well as related proteins FHL-1 and CFHR-1 to their surface, and FH binding is trypsin-resistant. Schizonts acquire FH via two contact sites, which involve CCP modules 5 and 20. Blockage of FH-mediated protection via anti-FH antibodies results in significantly impaired blood stage replication, pointing to the plasmodial complement evasion machinery as a promising malaria vaccine target.

: http://publica.fraunhofer.de/documents/N-404152.html