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Reliable single cell array CGH for clinical samples

 
: Czyz, Zbigniew T.; Hoffmann, Martin; Schlimok, Günter; Polzer, Bernhard; Klein, Christoph A.

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Postprint (PDF; )

PLoS one. Online journal 9 (2014), No.1, Art. e85907, 10 pp.
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/tocrender.fcgi?action=archive&journal=440
ISSN: 1932-6203
English
Journal Article, Electronic Publication
Fraunhofer ITEM ()
BT474 cells; breast cancer; cancer treatment; DNA labeling; genetic loci; genome evolution; microarrays; high-dose chemotherapy

Abstract
Background
Disseminated cancer cells (DCCs) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are extremely rare, but comprise the precursors cells of distant metastases or therapy resistant cells. The detailed molecular analysis of these cells may help to identify key events of cancer cell dissemination, metastatic colony formation and systemic therapy escape.
Methodology/Principal Findings
Using the Ampli1DTM whole genome amplification (WGA) technology and high-resolution oligonucleotide aCGH microarrays we optimized conditions for the analysis of structural copy number changes. The protocol presented here enables reliable detection of numerical genomic alterations as small as 0.1 Mb in a single cell. Analysis of single cells from well-characterized cell lines and single normal cells confirmed the stringent quantitative nature of the amplification and hybridization protocol. Importantly, fixation and staining procedures used to detect DCCs showed no significant impact on the outcome of the analysis, proving the clinical usability of our method. In a proof-of-principle study we tracked the chromosomal changes of single DCCs over a full course of high-dose chemotherapy treatment by isolating and analyzing DCCs of an individual breast cancer patient at four different time points.
Conclusions/Significance
The protocol enables detailed genome analysis of DCCs and thereby assessment of the clonal evolution during the natural course of the disease and under selection pressures. The results from an exemplary patient provide evidence that DCCs surviving selective therapeutic conditions may be recruited from a pool of genomically less advanced cells, which display a stable subset of specific genomic alterations.

: http://publica.fraunhofer.de/documents/N-277658.html